Business & Information Technology Frequently Asked Questions

 

 

 

 


Q: Who can teach a Marketing course?

A: Both Marketing Education and Business Education Wisconsin Model Academic Standards include strands for Marketing. Marketing Model Academic Standards include more breadth and depth in this area than those offered in the Business Education Model Academic Standards. Whenever a school district is looking for the appropriate educator license for a particular course, we refer the district to the Model Academic Standards on which the course is aligned. The standards and, therefore, the curriculum determine the necessary licensure.

For Example: A course titled Introduction or Exploring Business and Marketing may be aligned to either set of standards and would be appropriately taught by a business or marketing educator. Marketing, as an introductory course, may be taught by either a business or marketing licensed teacher, depending on the standards alignment. A course titled, Marketing I (assuming a coherent sequence of courses), aligned to Marketing standards, would appropriately be taught by a marketing education teacher.

NOTE: Please be advised that it is impossible in all cases to determine the appropriate licensure from a course title. Each district must evaluate all local information to determine the correct licensure for each course.


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Q: Who can teach an Entrepreneurship course?

A: Entrepreneurship concepts are taught in many areas of the curriculum through Career & Technical Education and in academic coursework. However, a standalone Entrepreneurship class can be taught by either a Business OR Marketing licensed teacher.

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Q: Who can teach keyboarding?

A: Keyboarding taught in the 7-12 grades must be taught by a licensed business education teacher (250 or 251) OR a business education teacher with a specific license for keyboarding (previously typewriting) (265).

Keyboarding taught in grades lower than 7th grade must be taught under one of the following options:

  1. a business education teacher licensed for K-12
  2. a licensed elementary teacher instructing their own students
  3. a team consisting of a business education teacher licensed for grades 7-12 and the classroom teacher

If a business teacher is team teaching with the elementary classroom teacher, no additional license is required.

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Q: Who can teach web design?

A: If web design is part of the business curriculum, it should be taught by the business teacher. If web design is part of an art curriculum, it should be taught by an art teacher. According to DPI licensing, web page production can be taught by art, business education or technology education teachers (depends on credit given). If called an "elective," licensing asks (1) who--department--is developing the course and (2) which content area standards (strands) are used in developing the course.

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Q: Who can teach computer programming?

A: A computer science (405) license is required to teach advanced computer courses which contain more than 25% programming content.

  • Introductory computer literacy courses containing less than 25% programming content may be taught by any licensed regular education teacher who is licensed for the grade level of the course, including business education teachers.

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Q: How do I get the 250, 281 or 285 license?

A: First you will need to contact a local Institute for Higher Education (IHE) to have them review your previous educational background and transcripts. A program or plan can be developed with you to get you started on the coursework that may be necessary for the IHE to verify a license application for any or all of these licenses. A listing of approved IHE programs can be found here: Approved Programs for Licensing Wisconsin Educators

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Q: How do I provide documentation of work hours for the 281 or 285 vocational license?

A: In order to be considered for the business-vocational (281) and marketing education (285) license, you will need to submit verification of paid, related occupational experience on your employer(s) letterhead.

  • For the 281 license, submit verification of 2000 hours of paid, business-related occupational experience.
  • For the 285 license, submit verification of 4000 hours of paid, marketing-related occupational experience.

Any correspondence sent to the DPI on your behalf should be sent to my attention at DPI-Educator Licensing, PO Box 7841, Madison WI 53707-7841 and must contain your name and DPI file number (noted above).

Employers should list your years of employment, types of duties performed and number of hours performing those duties. Once received, those letters will be shared with the Business Education and Marketing Education consultants for their review and recommendation for licensure. Please do not submit W2 forms; this information does not provide the detail needed (see above).

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Q: Can I use volunteer hours toward my 281 or 285 license?

A: A total of 400 of these hours (or 20% of the hours necessary) for a 281 license or 800 of these hours (again, 20% of the hours necessary) would be accepted as hours toward a vocational license.

Letters outlining your volunteer service and the types of skills utilized during this service must be submitted as part of your license application from the organization receiving these services. Please submit this information, along with verification of the remaining required hours, and your application (http://www.dpi.wi.gov/files/forms/pdf/f1602-5r.pdf) to the licensing department at DPI.

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Q: Where do I locate Youth Apprenticeship and Coop Certificate Program Information?

A: The Youth Apprenticeship Program in Wisconsin is administered by the Department of Workforce Development. Information on these programs can be found at http://dwd.wisconsin.gov/youthapprenticeship/. Coop Skill Standards Certificates in all CTE disciplines, Employability Skills, and Leadership are administered by the CTE department at DPI. Information on these programs can be found at: http://cte.dpi.wi.gov/cte_workbase.

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Q: How do I become a PDP reviewer?

A: To be a Professional Development Plan (PDP) Team member on an Initial or Professional Educator's team, you need to complete DPI-sponsored training. The training has two components. The first is an on-line (http://www.uwex.edu/ics/PI34/) and includes a self-assessment. Upon completing this module, you will be asked to print a verification certificate. The second component is registration and participation in a one-day DPI-sponsored PDP Team Training, hosted through License Renewal Support Centers, School Districts and UniServs. If you would like to participate in one of these sessions, please work through the contact person listed for each location. IMPORTANT: You must bring your verification certificate to the training. Check here for an up-to-date listing of PDP Team Trainings: http://dpi.wi.gov/tepdl/doc/pdptrain.doc

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Q: How do I locate a PDP reviewer for my PDP cycle?

A: If you are a QEI (Quality Educator Initiative) site user, you can search for those business teachers who are registered with QEI to perform this service. Otherwise, be sure to check out these lists of trained PDP reviewers: http://tepdl.dpi.wi.gov/pdpteammembers.

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Q: Who can teach a Personal Financial Literacy course?

A:Personal Financial Literacy embedded within a specific discipline and based on the Wisconsin Model Academic Standards for both that specific discipline and the Personal Financial Literacy may be taught by any teacher licensed in that discipline.

A stand-alone Personal Financial Literacy course that is not embedded in a specific discipline and based on the Wisconsin Model Academic Standards for Personal Financial Literacy may be taught by any teacher holding one of the following licenses:

  • Business Education (250 or 251)
  • Family and Consumer Science (210)
  • Economics (710)


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Q: Are there resources that show that teaching financial literacy is effective?

A: Here are just a few resources that may be helpful:

 

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Q: If I want or need to teach a course online, are there any special requirements?
 

A: Section(s) of the Budget Act: 1757 that affected Statutes:  118.19(13) Repealed the statute that, prior to repeal, prohibited any individual from teaching an online course in a public school, including a charter school, unless he or she had completed at least 30 hours of professional development designed to prepare a teacher for online teaching.


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Q: Who can teach online courses?

A: Section(s) of the Budget Act: 1757 that affected Statutes:  118.19(13) Repealed the statute that, prior to repeal, prohibited any individual from teaching an online course in a public school, including a charter school, unless he or she had completed at least 30 hours of professional development designed to prepare a teacher for online teaching.

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Q: How do I start a Business Education Honor Society?

A: Information can be found at http://www.nbea.org/newsite/about/NBHS.html regarding the National Business Honor Society. Currently, three chapters in Wisconsin exist—Xavier High School, Seymour Community High School, and Oshkosh West High School.

Another option is the National Technical Honor Society. This Honor Society can be used to develop a collaborative model with all CTSOs in a school. Information can be found here: http://www.nths.org/. There are currently six high school chapters in Wisconsin: Brown Deer, Racine-Horlick, Watertown, Wisconsin Lutheran, Washburn, and Sun Prairie High Schools.

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For questions about this information, contact David Thomas (608) 266-2348